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Perimeter Institute Quantum Discussions

This series consists of weekly discussion sessions on foundations of quantum Theory and quantum information theory. The sessions start with an informal exposition of an interesting topic, research result or important question in the field. Everyone is strongly encouraged to participate with questions and comments.

Seminar Series Events/Videos

 

 

Mercredi oct 21, 2020
Speaker(s): 

Discriminating between unknown objects in a given set is a fundamental task in experimental science. Suppose you are given a quantum system which is in one of two given states with equal probability. Determining the actual state of the system amounts to doing a measurement on it which would allow you to discriminate between the two possible states. It is known that unless the two states are mutually orthogonal, perfect discrimination is possible only if you are given arbitrarily many identical copies of the state.

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Mercredi oct 14, 2020
Speaker(s): 

Unitary t-designs are the bread and butter of quantum information theory and beyond. An important issue in practice is that of efficiently constructing good approximations of such unitary t-designs. Building on results by Aubrun (Comm. Math. Phys. 2009), we prove that sampling dtpoly(t,logd,1/ϵ) unitaries from an exact t-design provides with positive probability an ϵ-approximate t-design, if the error is measured in one-to-one norm.

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Mercredi oct 07, 2020
Speaker(s): 

The Petz recovery channel plays an important role in quantum information science as an operation that approximately reverses the effect of a quantum channel. The pretty good measurement is a special case of the Petz recovery channel, and it allows for near-optimal state discrimination. A hurdle to the experimental realization of these vaunted theoretical tools is the lack of a systematic and efficient method to implement them.

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Mercredi sep 30, 2020
Speaker(s): 

Zero-knowledge proofs are one of the cornerstones of modern cryptography. It is well known that any language in NP admits a zero-knowledge proof. In the quantum setting, it is possible to go beyond NP. Zero-knowledge proofs for QMA have first been studied in a work of Broadbent et al (FOCS'16). There, the authors show that any language in QMA has an (interactive) zero-knowledge proof. In this talk, I will describe an idea, based on quantum teleportation, to remove interaction at the cost of adding an instance-independent preprocessing step.

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Mercredi sep 23, 2020
Speaker(s): 

We study the problem of learning the Hamiltonian of a quantum many-body system given samples from its Gibbs (thermal) state. The classical analog of this problem, known as learning graphical models or Boltzmann machines, is a well-studied question in machine learning and statistics. In this work, we give the first sample-efficient algorithm for the quantum Hamiltonian learning problem. In particular, we prove that polynomially many samples in the number of particles (qudits) are necessary and sufficient for learning the parameters of a spatially local Hamiltonian in l_2-norm.

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Mercredi sep 16, 2020
Speaker(s): 

We reconsider the black hole firewall puzzle, emphasizing that quantum error-correction, computational complexity, and pseudorandomness are crucial concepts for understanding the black hole interior. We assume that the Hawking radiation emitted by an old black hole is pseudorandom, meaning that it cannot be distinguished from a perfectly thermal state by any efficient quantum computation acting on the radiation alone. We then infer the existence of a subspace of the radiation system which we interpret as an encoding of the black hole interior.

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Mercredi juin 17, 2020
Speaker(s): 

Given a vector in a representation, can it be distinguished from zero by an invariant polynomial? This classical question in invariant theory relates to a diverse set of problems in mathematics and computer science. In quantum information, it captures the quantum marginal problem and recent bounds on tensor ranks. We will see that the general question can be usefully thought of as an optimization problem and discuss how this perspective leads to efficient algorithms for solving it.

 

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Mercredi mai 27, 2020
Speaker(s): 

Many quantum information protocols require the implementation of random unitaries. Because it takes exponential resources to produce Haar-random unitaries drawn from the full n-qubit group, one often resorts to t-designs. Unitary t-designs mimic the Haar-measure up to t-th moments. It is known that Clifford operations can implement at most 3-designs. In this work, we quantify the non-Clifford resources required to break this barrier.

 

 

Mercredi mai 20, 2020
Speaker(s): 

Given the large push by academia and industry (e.g., IBM and Google), quantum computers with hundred(s) of qubits are at the brink of existence with the promise of outperforming any classical computer. Demonstration of computational advantages of noisy near-term quantum computers over classical computers is an imperative near-term goal. The foremost candidate task for showing this is Random Circuit Sampling (RCS), which is the task of sampling from the output distribution of a random circuit. This is exactly the task that recently Google experimentally performed on 53-qubits.

 

 

Mercredi mai 13, 2020
Speaker(s): 

Basic statistical properties of quantum many-body systems in thermal equilibrium can be obtained from their partition function. In this talk, I will present a quasi-polynomial time classical algorithm that estimates the partition function of quantum many-body systems at temperatures above the thermal phase transition point. It is known that in the worst case, the same problem is NP-hard below this temperature. This shows that the transition in the phase of a quantum system is also accompanied by a transition in the computational hardness of estimating its statistical properties.

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