Colloquium

This series covers all areas of research at Perimeter Institute, as well as those outside of PI's scope.

Seminar Series Events/Videos

Jan 22 2020 - 2:00pm
Room #: 294
Speaker(s):
Jan 29 2020 - 2:00pm
Room #: 294
Speaker(s):
Scientific Areas:
Mar 4 2020 - 2:00pm
Room #: 294
Speaker(s):
Scientific Areas:
TBA
Mar 13 2020 - 2:00pm
Room #: 400
Speaker(s):

 

Wednesday Jan 15, 2020
Speaker(s): 

Our ability to model cosmological observations has reached an awesome level, a tour de force of observational innovation, sophisticated statistical inference, and delicate numerical computation. There’s little doubt that the Standard Cosmological Model will stand the test of time. But what has it told us and what is still missing? What are the prospects for learning particle physics and condensed matter from cosmology? And what can the path we’ve taken to reach this point tell us about where it might lead?

Collection/Series: 

 

Wednesday Jan 08, 2020
Speaker(s): 

I will start with an introduction into the framework of perturbative algebraic quantum field theory (pAQFT), which is a mathematically rigorous approach to perturbative QFT. In its original formulation, it is based on the Haag-Kastler axiomatic framework, where locality is a fundamental principle. In my talk I will discuss how it can be extended to treat also non-local observables, with potential applications to effective quantum gravity

Collection/Series: 

 

Wednesday Dec 11, 2019
Speaker(s): 

At the heart of the quantum measurement problem lies the ambiguity about exactly when to use the unitary evolution of the quantum state and when to use the state-update in dynamics of quantum mechanical systems. In the Wigner’s friend gedankenexperiment, different observers (one of whom is observed by the other) describe one and the same interaction differently. One – the friend – uses the state-update rule and the other – Wigner – chooses unitary evolution.

Collection/Series: 

 

Wednesday Dec 04, 2019
Speaker(s): 

Cosmological simulations of galaxy formation have evolved significantly over the last years.
In my talk I will describe recent efforts to model the large-scale distribution
of galaxies with cosmological hydrodynamics simulations. I will focus on the
Illustris simulation, and our new simulation campaign, the IllustrisTNG
project. After demonstrating the success of these simulations in terms of
reproducing an enormous amount of observational data, I will also talk about
their limitations and directions for further improvements over the next couple

Collection/Series: 

 

Wednesday Nov 27, 2019
Speaker(s): 

We provide the first example of a symmetry protected quantum phase that has universal computational power. Throughout this phase, which lives in spatial dimension two, the ground state is a universal resource for measurement based quantum computation. Joint work with Cihan Okay, Dong-Sheng Wang, David T. Stephen, Hendrik Poulsen Nautrup; J-ref: Phys. Rev. Lett. 122, 090501

Collection/Series: 
Scientific Areas: 

 

Wednesday Nov 20, 2019

Recently they have been generalized to other 3d homogeneous spaces, namely 3d anti de Sitter space and half-pipe space, a 3d homogeneous space with a degenerate metric.

We show that generalized ideal tetrahedra correspond to dual tetrahedra in 3d Minkowski, de Sitter and anti de Sitter space. They are those geodesic tetrahedra whose faces are all lightlike.

Collection/Series: 
Scientific Areas: 

 

Wednesday Nov 13, 2019
Speaker(s): 

Analytic renormalisation "à la Speer" using a multivariable approach typically leads to meromorphic germs in several variables whose poles are linear.  In particular,  Feynman integrals, multizeta functions and their generalisations, namely  discrete sums on cones and discrete sums associated with trees give rise to meromorphic germs at zero with linear poles. We shall present  a multivariable renormalisation scheme which amounts to a minimal subtraction scheme in several variables.

Collection/Series: 

 

Wednesday Nov 06, 2019
Speaker(s): 

Many complex systems have a generative, or linguistic, aspect: life is written in the language of DNA; protein structure is written in a language of amino acids, and human endeavour is often written in text. Are there universal aspects of the relationship between sequence and structure? I am trying to answer this question using models of random languages. Recently I proposed a model of random context-free languages [1] and showed using simulations that the model has a transition from an unintelligent phase to an ordered phase.

Collection/Series: 

 

Wednesday Oct 30, 2019
Speaker(s): 

We will talk about recent progress in NMR technologies simulating topological phases. We will describe how states are prepared, how they are evolved in time and various tricks that we can play with it, including measurements of topological properties such as modular matrices, and thus potentially applied for identifying phases of matter in future simulations.

 

Collection/Series: 

 

Wednesday Oct 23, 2019
Speaker(s): 

There is a profound lack of diversity in science labs and classrooms, which has a negative impact on productivity. Scientific research demonstrates that diverse groups are more creative and better able to solve problems. Though the perception is that things are improving, NSERC’s recently released report shows that attrition rates in Canadian STEM fields are higher for women than for men at all career stages and that the percentage of women has not changed substantially in the last 15 years. Racialized and Indigenous people are also underrepresented at Canadian universities.

Collection/Series: 

Pages