Video Library

Since 2002 Perimeter Institute has been recording seminars, conference talks, public outreach events such as talks from top scientists using video cameras installed in our lecture theatres.  Perimeter now has 7 formal presentation spaces for its many scientific conferences, seminars, workshops and educational outreach activities, all with advanced audio-visual technical capabilities. 

Recordings of events in these areas are all available and On-Demand from this Video Library and on Perimeter Institute Recorded Seminar Archive (PIRSA)PIRSA is a permanent, free, searchable, and citable archive of recorded seminars from relevant bodies in physics. This resource has been partially modelled after Cornell University's arXiv.org. 

Accessibly by anyone with internet, Perimeter aims to share the power and wonder of science with this free library.

 

  

 

Wednesday Jul 10, 2019
Speaker(s): 

Variational algorithms for a gate-based quantum computer, like the QAOA, prescribe a fixed circuit ansatz --- up to a set of continuous parameters --- that is designed to find a low-energy state of a given target Hamiltonian. After reviewing the relevant aspects of the QAOA, I will describe attempts to make the algorithm more efficient.

Scientific Areas: 

 

Wednesday Jul 10, 2019
Speaker(s): 

Computer simulations are extremely useful in providing insight on the physical and chemical processes taking places in nature. Very often simulations are complementary to experimental investigations, providing the interpretations and the molecular level understanding that experiments struggle to deliver. Yet, simulations are useful only when their results may be relied upon, that is, when they can accurately model the physical system and the forces therein.

Scientific Areas: 

 

Tuesday Jul 09, 2019
Speaker(s): 

Quantum anomalies are violations of classical scaling symmetries caused by quantum fluctuations. Although they appear prominently in quantum field theory to regularize divergent physical quanti- ties, their influence on experimental observables is difficult to discern. Here, we discovered a striking manifestation of a quantum anomaly in the momentum-space dynamics of a 2D Fermi superfluid of ultracold atoms. We measured the position and pair momentum distribution of the superfluid during a breathing mode cycle for different interaction strengths across the BEC-BCS crossover.

Scientific Areas: 

 

Tuesday Jul 09, 2019
Speaker(s): 

In the first half, I will demonstrate an efficient and general approach for realizing non-trivial quantum states, such as quantum critical and topologically ordered states, in quantum simulators. In the second half, I will present a related variational ansatz for many-body quantum systems that is remarkably efficient. In particular, representing the critical point of the one-dimensional transverse field Ising model only requires a number of variational parameters scaling logarithmically with system size.

Scientific Areas: 

 

Tuesday Jul 09, 2019
Speaker(s): 

Various optimization problems that arise naturally in science are frequently solved by heuristic algorithms. Recently, multiple quantum enhanced algorithms have been proposed to speed up the optimization process, however a quantum speed up on practical problems has yet to be observed. One of the most promising candidates is the Quantum Approximate Optimization Algorithm (QAOA), introduced by Farhi et al. I will then discuss numerical and exact results we have obtained for the quantum Ising chain problem and compare the performance of the QAOA and the Quantum Annealing algorithm.

Scientific Areas: 

 

Tuesday Jul 09, 2019
Speaker(s): 

Successful implementation of error correction is imperative for fault-tolerant quantum computing. At present, the toric code, surface code and related stabilizer codes are state of the art techniques in error correction.
Standard decoders for these codes usually assume uncorrelated single qubit noise, which can prove problematic in a general setting.

Scientific Areas: 

 

Tuesday Jul 09, 2019

In this talk I will discuss how (unsupervised) machine learning methods can be useful for quantum experiments. Specifically, we will consider the use of a generative model to perform quantum many-body (pure) state reconstruction directly from experimental data. The power of this machine learning approach enables us to trade few experimentally complex measurements for many simpler ones, allowing for the extraction of sophisticated observables such as the Rényi mutual information.

Scientific Areas: 

Pages

Next Public Lecture

Check back for details on the next lecture in Perimeter's Public Lectures Series