Video Library

Since 2002 Perimeter Institute has been recording seminars, conference talks, public outreach events such as talks from top scientists using video cameras installed in our lecture theatres.  Perimeter now has 7 formal presentation spaces for its many scientific conferences, seminars, workshops and educational outreach activities, all with advanced audio-visual technical capabilities. 

Recordings of events in these areas are all available and On-Demand from this Video Library and on Perimeter Institute Recorded Seminar Archive (PIRSA)PIRSA is a permanent, free, searchable, and citable archive of recorded seminars from relevant bodies in physics. This resource has been partially modelled after Cornell University's arXiv.org. 

Accessibly by anyone with internet, Perimeter aims to share the power and wonder of science with this free library.

 

  

 

Thursday Jul 18, 2019

We investigate the emergence of classicality and objectivity in arbitrary physical theories. First we provide an explicit example of a theory where there are no objective states. Then we characterize classical states of generic theories, and show how classical physics emerges through a decoherence process, which always exists in causal theories as long as there are classical states. We apply these results to the study of the emergence of objectivity, here recast as a multiplayer game.

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Tuesday Jul 16, 2019
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Self-learning Monte Carlo (SLMC) method is a general-purpose numerical method to simulate many-body systems. SLMC can efficiently cure the critical slowing down in both bosonic and fermionic systems. Moreover, for fermionic systems, SLMC can generally reduce the computational complexity and speed up simulations even away from the critical points. For example, SLMC is more than 1000 times faster than the conventional method for the double exchange model in 8*8*8 cubic lattice.

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Tuesday Jul 16, 2019
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Canonical quantization is not well suited to quantize gravity, while affine quantization is. For those unfamiliar with affine quantization the talk will include a primer. This procedure is then applied to deal with three nonrenormalizable, field theoretical, problems of increasing difficulty, the last one being general relativity itself.

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Tuesday Jul 16, 2019
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I’ll discuss the issue of how we can tell which quantum state might be the “right “ one for inflationary quantum fluctuations. I’ll then use a new class of states that entangle curvature fluctuations with those of a spectator scalar field and discuss potential observational signatures of such states.

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Monday Jul 15, 2019
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Friday Jul 12, 2019
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Friday Jul 12, 2019
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Differentiable programming makes the optimization of a tensor network much cheaper (in unit of brain energy consumption) than before [e.g. arXiv: 1903.09650]. This talk mainly focuses on the technical aspects of differentiable programming tensor networks and quantum circuits with Yao.jl (https://github.com/QuantumBFS/Yao.jl). I will also show how quantum circuits can help with contracting and differentiating tensor networks.

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Friday Jul 12, 2019
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Friday Jul 12, 2019
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Modern Machine Learning (ML) relies on cost function optimization to train model parameters. The non-convexity of cost function landscapes results in the emergence of local minima in which state-of-the-art gradient descent optimizers get stuck. Similarly, in modern Quantum Control (QC), a key to understanding the difficulty of multiqubit state preparation holds the control landscape -- the mapping assigning to every control protocol its cost function value.

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Thursday Jul 11, 2019
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Belief-propagation (BP) decoders are responsible for the success of many modern coding schemes. While many classical coding schemes have been generalized to the quantum setting, the corresponding BP decoders are flawed by design in this setting. Inspired by an exact mapping between BP and deep neural networks, we train neural BP decoders for quantum low-density parity-check codes, with a loss function tailored for the quantum setting. Training substantially improves the performance of the original BP decoders.

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