Video Library

Since 2002 Perimeter Institute has been recording seminars, conference talks, public outreach events such as talks from top scientists using video cameras installed in our lecture theatres.  Perimeter now has 7 formal presentation spaces for its many scientific conferences, seminars, workshops and educational outreach activities, all with advanced audio-visual technical capabilities. 

Recordings of events in these areas are all available and On-Demand from this Video Library and on Perimeter Institute Recorded Seminar Archive (PIRSA)PIRSA is a permanent, free, searchable, and citable archive of recorded seminars from relevant bodies in physics. This resource has been partially modelled after Cornell University's arXiv.org. 

Accessibly by anyone with internet, Perimeter aims to share the power and wonder of science with this free library.

 

  

 

 

Friday Nov 13, 2020
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Using a process-theoretic formalism, we introduce the notion of a causal-inferential theory: a triple consisting of a theory of causal influences, a theory of inferences (of both the Boolean and Bayesian varieties), and a specification of how these interact. Recasting the notions of operational and realist theories in this mold clarifies what a realist account of an experiment offers beyond an operational account.

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Thursday Nov 12, 2020

We have tentative evidence of massive stars that disappear without a bright transient. It is commonly argued that this massive stars have low angular momentum and can collapse into a black hole without significant feedback. In this talk I will make use of general-relativistic hydrodynamical simulations to understand the flow around a newly-formed black hole. I will discuss the angular momentum needed in order for the infalling material to be accreted into the black hole without forming a centrifugally supported structure, thus generating no effective feedback.

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Wednesday Nov 11, 2020
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"Analogue" Hamiltonian simulation involves engineering a Hamiltonian of
interest in the laboratory and studying its properties experimentally.
Large-scale Hamiltonian simulation experiments have been carried out in
optical lattices, ion traps and other systems for two decades. Despite
this, the theoretical basis for Hamiltonian simulation is surprisingly
sparse. Even a precise definition of what it means to simulate a
Hamiltonian was lacking.

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Wednesday Nov 11, 2020
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A dark matter candidate lighter than about 30 eV exhibits wave behavior in a typical galactic environment. Examples include the QCD axion as well as other axion-like-particles. We review the particle physics motivations, and discuss experimental and observational implications of the wave dynamics, including interference substructures, vortices, soliton condensation and black hole hair.

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Tuesday Nov 10, 2020
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I will present a holographic framework for reconstructing the experience of bulk observers in AdS/CFT. In particular, I will show how to recover the proper time and energy distribution measured along bulk worldlines, directly in the CFT via a universal, background-independent prescription. For an observer falling into an eternal AdS black hole, the proposal resolves a conceptual puzzle raised by Marolf and Wall.

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Tuesday Nov 10, 2020
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In order to infer cosmological parameters from galaxy survey data, we typically use summary statistics such as the power spectrum and we need an accurate estimate of their covariance matrix. The traditional process of obtaining the covariance involves simulating thousands of mocks. I will present an analytic approach for the covariance matrix which is more than four orders of magnitude faster than mocks and show its validation with an analysis of the BOSS DR12 data. Furthermore, our analytic approach is free of sampling noise which makes it useful for upcoming surveys like DESI and Euclid.

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Monday Nov 09, 2020
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Quantum entanglement of pure states has led to new insights into a wide variety of topics. Entanglement of mixed states is however less well understood. In this talk I will focus on a few themes where mixed-state entanglement leads to new insights that are difficult to obtain otherwise. I will mainly focus on two topics: (i) Characterizing finite-temperature topological order (ii) Detecting presence/absence of quasiparticles.

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